Criminal Justice Motivational Theories Matrix

Criminal Justice Motivational Theories Matrix

 

Motivational Theory Description How does the theory apply to working in criminal justice and security?
Frederick Herzberg motivational theory The theory postulated by Herzberg states that the satisfaction or dissatisfaction of employees at the place of work is an interplay of many factors. The theory is tailored towards acknowledging that primary motivators such as recognition and recognition are more encouraging in addition to salary and monetary rewards such as earnings and money. The theory is applicable in criminal justice because of its emphasis on achievement and the need for recognition as the primary reward for employees. The primary rewards can then be supported by secondary rewards such as money
McClelland’s Human Motivation Theory David McClelland’s Human Motivation Theory gives managers and leaders a way of identifying people’s motivating drivers. This can then help them give praise and feedback effectively, assign the employees suitable tasks, and keep them motivated. The theory appreciates that people are bound to react differently to certain motivational factors thus in the field of criminal justice or security, the leaders can identify motivational drivers that are specific to each and every employee
Content Theory This theory seeks to explain why employees change their charater, motivation and attitude after working for some period of time. The theory reiterates that the levels of motivation supported by the manager is pertinent to instigating these changes which might either be positive or negative. The content theory is an integration of works by Abraham Maslow and David McClelland. This is because their theories are focused on explaining why the needs of employee change with time. Neither of these theories is self supporting thus they borrow from each other. A person working in the criminal justice or security sector can harmonize the content theory with other  theories to extract a contextual framework that will facilitate their dealing with criminals.
Temporal motivation theory (TMT) TMT represents an integrationof integrative theories on motivation. The theory was postulated by Cornelius Konig and  Piers Steel and it is aimed at emphasizing the need for motivation among employees. The theory integrates multiple theories among them being the hyperbolic discounting, expectancy theory, cumulative prospect theory and need theory The theory encourages managers to avoid procrastinating their rewards because the TMT theory presents a formula which can be applied in the criminal justice field to influence human behavior, goal setting and improved performance
ERG Theory ERG Theory borrows heavily from the Maslows Hierachy of Needs. The theory supports that human needs or their position in the needs hierarchy determines the type of motivation. At the base is psychological needs followed by relatedness needs, security and self actualization. The theory can be applied to security and criminal justice becaue it encourages manager to motivate people depending on their levels of personal achievement and satisfaction

 

References

 

  1. Kanghwa, S., Jianqiao, L., & Mohsin, B. (2013). The Incentive Model of Workplace Well-Being Based on the ERG Theory. (English). Modern Management (21607311)3(3), 108-112.
  2. Mcreynolds, J. (2012). Motivational Theories & Psychology. Delhi: English Press.
  3. Steel P, König C. Integrating theories of motivation. Academy Of Management Review [serial online]. October 2006;31(4):889-913.
ACED ESSAYS