Is it ever moral to break a promise?

Thread: The Reading & Study materials this module/week discuss the complex issue of poverty, and the moral imperative of promise-keeping is mentioned several times. After reviewing the Reading & Study materials, compose a 500-600 word argument that is objective, carefully-constructed, and free of emotion (and hence it should not contain any exclamation points) in support of your opinion on each of the following questions.

  1. Why is promise-keeping morally important?
  2. Is it ever morally permissible to break a promise?
  3. If you answer “yes” to #2, then what are the conditions that render promise-breaking morally acceptable?
  4. If you answer “no” to #2, then explain why you believe it is never permissible. How would you handle difficult scenarios wherein someone has made a promise the keeping of which would have significant undesirable consequences?
  5. Is it ever morally obligatory to break a promise?
  6. If you answer “yes” to #5, what are the conditions that render promise-breaking morally obligatory?

Be sure to carefully define your terms. You are encouraged to support your position with rational arguments, fitting examples, and expert sources. Any quotes or information used from sources other than yourself must be cited using footnotes in current Turabian format and will not count towards the total word count.

You will be penalized for falling short or exceeding the word count. This is a university-level writing assignment and therefore it must be carefully proofread, free of grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors. Do not use slang, emoticons, or abbreviations (as if you are texting or sending an email to a friend).

Readings

Textbook Readings
• Jones: chs. 5–6
• Stivers et al.: Part 3

Moral Reasoning: An Intentional Approach to Distinguishing Right from Wrong
Chapter 5:Ethical Egoism

Moral Reasoning: An Intentional Approach to Distinguishing Right from Wrong
Chapter 6: Utilitarianism

Christian Ethics: A Case Method Approach, 4th Edition
Part III
Author: James B Martin Schramm;Laura A.
Stivers;Christine E. Gudorf

VBID: 9781608331093

Additional Readings

• David K. Clark and Robert V. Rakestraw, eds., Readings in Christian Ethics, vol. 1: Theory and Method. Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1994, and vol. 2: Isues and Applications. Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1996.
o The first of these two anthologies deals with issues in Christian metaethics in a way that differs greatly from but is complementary to the material presented in the textbook Moral Reasoning. The second deals with options and arguments in applied ethics from a Christian perspective but in a way that differs greatly from the material presented in the textbook Christian Ethics. These volumes both come highly recommend. They are a bit old, but they are good.

Turabian formatting information

Sample Solution

ACED ESSAYS