Final Exam Overview

Final Exam Part 1: (attached is the template 2 pages)
The first part of the Final Exam requires students to use the CCLE Self-Assessments (attached) and the ULead Disposition Assessment (attached) to inform a “Personal Leadership Development Plan.

Directions for Personal Leadership Development Plans: template and overview (attached)

Final Exam Part 2: (essay for the 2 questions in the end of this document)
The Final Exam activity for this course includes a personal narrative that will describe your leadership development journey. This fully developed personal narrative should be structured in two sections and is available in Tk20.
End of course assignment directions: Engage your mentor in a conversation about their own experience with them using the questions as a guide for your discussion.
1. Which of the performance indicators from this standard are most pervasive or important in your day to day work? Why?
2. Which indicators do you personally find most challenging? Why?
3. What advice do you have for me as an aspiring leader about this performance standard?

GADOE Leadership Assessment Performance Standard 1: (Instructional Leadership) The leader fosters the success of all students by facilitating the development, communication, implementation, and evaluation of a shared vision of teaching and learning that leads to school improvement.
Sample Performance Indicators examples may include, but are not limited to:
The leader:
• Articulates a vision and works collaboratively with staff, students, parents, and other stakeholders to develop a mission and programs consistent with the district’s strategic plan.
• Analyzes current academic achievement data and instructional strategies to make appropriate educational decisions to improve classroom instruction, increase student achievement, and improve overall school effectiveness.
• Uses student achievement data to determine school effectiveness and directs school staff to actively analyze data for improving results.
• Monitors and evaluates the effectiveness of instructional programs to promote the achievement of academic standards.
• Possesses knowledge of and directs school staff to implement research-based instructional best practices in the classroom.
• Provides leadership for the design and implementation of effective and efficient schedules that maximize instructional time.
• Works collaboratively with staff to identify needs and to design, revise, and monitor instruction to ensure effective delivery of the required curriculum.
• Provides the focus for continued learning of all members of the school community.
Level III is the expected level of performance but many beginning leaders are at Level II.

Level IV
The leader actively and continually employs innovative and effective leadership strategies that maximize student learning and result in a shared vision of teaching and learning that reflects excellence. (Leaders rated Level IV continually seek ways to serve as role models and collaborative leaders.)

Level III
The leader consistently fosters the success of all students by facilitating the development, communication, implementation, and evaluation of a shared vision of teaching and learning that leads to school improvement.

Level II
The leader inconsistently fosters the success of students by facilitating the development, communication, implementation, or evaluation of a shared vision of teaching and learning that leads to school improvement.

Level I
The leader does not foster the success of all students by facilitating the development, communication, implementation, or evaluation of a shared vision of teaching and learning that leads to school improvement.

GADOE Leadership Assessment Performance Standard 6: (Teacher and Staff Evaluation) The leader fairly and consistently evaluates school personnel in accordance with state and district guidelines and provides them with timely and constructive feedback focused on improved student learning.
Sample Performance Indicators examples may include, but are not limited to:
The leader:
• Has a thorough understanding of the teacher and staff evaluation systems and understands the important role evaluation plays in teacher development.
• Provides support, resources, and remediation for teachers and staff to improve job performance.
• Documents deficiencies and proficiencies and provides timely formal and informal feedback on strengths and weaknesses.
• Evaluates performance of personnel using multiple sources consistent with district policies and maintains accurate evaluation records.
• Makes recommendations related to promotion and retention consistent with established policies and procedures and with student learning as a primary consideration.
• Involves teachers and staff in designing and implementing Professional Development Plans.
Level III is the expected level of performance although many beginning leaders are at level II.

Level IV
The leader continually provides teachers and staff with highly effective formative and summative feedback resulting in improved school personnel performance and higher student growth. The leader mentors other leaders in the evaluation process. (Leaders rated Level IV continually seek ways to serve as role models and collaborative leaders.)

Level III
The leader consistently and fairly evaluates school personnel in accordance with state and district guidelines and provides them with timely and constructive feedback focused on improved student learning.

Level II
The leader fairly evaluates school personnel, but inconsistently follows state and district guidelines. Feedback is not consistent, timely, constructive, or focused on improved student learning.

Level I
The leader does not fairly evaluate school personnel or does not follow state or district guidelines. Feedback fails to be either timely, constructive, or focused on improved student learning.

Responses will be scored based on the extent to which they demonstrate understanding and application of the specific standards. Responses should range from 250 – 300 words.

1. As I reflect the content and skills I acquired in EDLE 6312 – Principles of Leadership, what connections do I see between the course and performance indicators for Performance Standard 1 – Instructional Leadership and Performance Standard 6 – Teacher and Staff Evaluation?

2. As I consider becoming an educational leader in the near future, with which aspects of these standards am I likely to excel and struggle? What plan will I implement to ensure I reach proficiency (level III) for these standards?

Sample Solution

Sample solution

Dante Alighieri played a critical role in the literature world through his poem Divine Comedy that was written in the 14th century. The poem contains Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. The Inferno is a description of the nine circles of torment that are found on the earth. It depicts the realms of the people that have gone against the spiritual values and who, instead, have chosen bestial appetite, violence, or fraud and malice. The nine circles of hell are limbo, lust, gluttony, greed and wrath. Others are heresy, violence, fraud, and treachery. The purpose of this paper is to examine the Dante’s Inferno in the perspective of its portrayal of God’s image and the justification of hell. 

In this epic poem, God is portrayed as a super being guilty of multiple weaknesses including being egotistic, unjust, and hypocritical. Dante, in this poem, depicts God as being more human than divine by challenging God’s omnipotence. Additionally, the manner in which Dante describes Hell is in full contradiction to the morals of God as written in the Bible. When god arranges Hell to flatter Himself, He commits egotism, a sin that is common among human beings (Cheney, 2016). The weakness is depicted in Limbo and on the Gate of Hell where, for instance, God sends those who do not worship Him to Hell. This implies that failure to worship Him is a sin.

God is also depicted as lacking justice in His actions thus removing the godly image. The injustice is portrayed by the manner in which the sodomites and opportunists are treated. The opportunists are subjected to banner chasing in their lives after death followed by being stung by insects and maggots. They are known to having done neither good nor bad during their lifetimes and, therefore, justice could have demanded that they be granted a neutral punishment having lived a neutral life. The sodomites are also punished unfairly by God when Brunetto Lattini is condemned to hell despite being a good leader (Babor, T. F., McGovern, T., & Robaina, K. (2017). While he commited sodomy, God chooses to ignore all the other good deeds that Brunetto did.

Finally, God is also portrayed as being hypocritical in His actions, a sin that further diminishes His godliness and makes Him more human. A case in point is when God condemns the sin of egotism and goes ahead to commit it repeatedly. Proverbs 29:23 states that “arrogance will bring your downfall, but if you are humble, you will be respected.” When Slattery condemns Dante’s human state as being weak, doubtful, and limited, he is proving God’s hypocrisy because He is also human (Verdicchio, 2015). The actions of God in Hell as portrayed by Dante are inconsistent with the Biblical literature. Both Dante and God are prone to making mistakes, something common among human beings thus making God more human.

To wrap it up, Dante portrays God is more human since He commits the same sins that humans commit: egotism, hypocrisy, and injustice. Hell is justified as being a destination for victims of the mistakes committed by God. The Hell is presented as being a totally different place as compared to what is written about it in the Bible. As a result, reading through the text gives an image of God who is prone to the very mistakes common to humans thus ripping Him off His lofty status of divine and, instead, making Him a mere human. Whether or not Dante did it intentionally is subject to debate but one thing is clear in the poem: the misconstrued notion of God is revealed to future generations.

 

References

Babor, T. F., McGovern, T., & Robaina, K. (2017). Dante’s inferno: Seven deadly sins in scientific publishing and how to avoid them. Addiction Science: A Guide for the Perplexed, 267.

Cheney, L. D. G. (2016). Illustrations for Dante’s Inferno: A Comparative Study of Sandro Botticelli, Giovanni Stradano, and Federico Zuccaro. Cultural and Religious Studies4(8), 487.

Verdicchio, M. (2015). Irony and Desire in Dante’s” Inferno” 27. Italica, 285-297.