One criticism of electronic ballots for elections is that while intuitive for younger voters who are familiar with using a mouse to point and click, elderly voters and motor-impaired users will have difficulty controlling a mouse. Discuss how you would correct this issue so that every demographic would have an equal opportunity to vote. Support your answer. Imagine you have just finished interviewing a recent college graduate for a design position within your company.

Respond to this comment, addressing the legal, societal, and ethical issues that designers face in regard to human-computer interaction. Evaluate interface design models and describe design issues across human-computer interaction environments associated with these models. Support your response. Building an interface can be broken down into the phases of design and development. Analyze the activities that take place in both phases, and explain why certain activities should be included in design but not in development.

Direct Manipulation and Virtual Environments.Your software development company has been contracted to build a tool that will manage user accounts and rights in an Active Directory environment. One of your developers tells you that he wants the tool to make use of direct manipulation. A second developer argues that a command line structure would be a better and more secure approach. Take a stand on this argument, providing at least three positives of each approach, and then make a decision for this project and support it. Describe virtual and augmented reality. Suggest a way in which this technology could be used in the future; either to improve a current process / procedure or create a new process / procedure.

“Menu Selection and Organization” : Describe the considerations that you would take into account when selecting the menu style for an application and why. Support your response with examples. Imagine you have been asked to help a novice designer effectively organize his menu content in an application. Provide the novice designer with the advice you feel would be most helpful when organizing content for menus. Support your response.

Command and Natural Language : The president of your company approached you with his iPhone in one hand and his iPad in the other. He has just purchased the iPhone 4S and is fascinated with Sid, the voice recognition software. He then pulls up an app your team developed for the company a few months ago and tells you that he wants it to work with voice commands just like Sid. When you pass this information on to your team, the news is met with groans and angry expressions. One of your developers tells you that it would be way too complicated to add voice recognition into the app and that you should have said no. Suggest three techniques to overcome the challenges of implementing natural language into interface designs. Sally, a young developer, requests a meeting with you to discuss a project. Sally tells you that she wants to develop a new application in a computer language she has developed, hoping to use the project as proof of concept for her newly developed language. Your firm encourages technological development and advancement and has allowed similar developments to happen in the past. Discuss with Sally what is required to be considered an effective computer language. Suggest three characteristics that make up an effective computer language. Support your response with evidence from the textbook or an article you found.

Developing Commands” You have just finished reviewing a design project your team has submitted to you and noticed that the team members used a great deal of command abbreviations. Explain to your team the value of using abbreviations for commands and give them at least two advantages and disadvantages associated with using abbreviations. Support your answer. From the e-Activity, Amore’s and Quesada’s article discusses the challenges of incorporating Natural Command Language Dialogs (NCLDs) into a phone system. One challenge pertains to sources of conflict in NCLDs. Discuss potential sources of conflict with an interface that you frequently use and devise a solution for preventing the conflicts.

 

 

 

Sample Solution

Sample solution

Dante Alighieri played a critical role in the literature world through his poem Divine Comedy that was written in the 14th century. The poem contains Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. The Inferno is a description of the nine circles of torment that are found on the earth. It depicts the realms of the people that have gone against the spiritual values and who, instead, have chosen bestial appetite, violence, or fraud and malice. The nine circles of hell are limbo, lust, gluttony, greed and wrath. Others are heresy, violence, fraud, and treachery. The purpose of this paper is to examine the Dante’s Inferno in the perspective of its portrayal of God’s image and the justification of hell. 

In this epic poem, God is portrayed as a super being guilty of multiple weaknesses including being egotistic, unjust, and hypocritical. Dante, in this poem, depicts God as being more human than divine by challenging God’s omnipotence. Additionally, the manner in which Dante describes Hell is in full contradiction to the morals of God as written in the Bible. When god arranges Hell to flatter Himself, He commits egotism, a sin that is common among human beings (Cheney, 2016). The weakness is depicted in Limbo and on the Gate of Hell where, for instance, God sends those who do not worship Him to Hell. This implies that failure to worship Him is a sin.

God is also depicted as lacking justice in His actions thus removing the godly image. The injustice is portrayed by the manner in which the sodomites and opportunists are treated. The opportunists are subjected to banner chasing in their lives after death followed by being stung by insects and maggots. They are known to having done neither good nor bad during their lifetimes and, therefore, justice could have demanded that they be granted a neutral punishment having lived a neutral life. The sodomites are also punished unfairly by God when Brunetto Lattini is condemned to hell despite being a good leader (Babor, T. F., McGovern, T., & Robaina, K. (2017). While he commited sodomy, God chooses to ignore all the other good deeds that Brunetto did.

Finally, God is also portrayed as being hypocritical in His actions, a sin that further diminishes His godliness and makes Him more human. A case in point is when God condemns the sin of egotism and goes ahead to commit it repeatedly. Proverbs 29:23 states that “arrogance will bring your downfall, but if you are humble, you will be respected.” When Slattery condemns Dante’s human state as being weak, doubtful, and limited, he is proving God’s hypocrisy because He is also human (Verdicchio, 2015). The actions of God in Hell as portrayed by Dante are inconsistent with the Biblical literature. Both Dante and God are prone to making mistakes, something common among human beings thus making God more human.

To wrap it up, Dante portrays God is more human since He commits the same sins that humans commit: egotism, hypocrisy, and injustice. Hell is justified as being a destination for victims of the mistakes committed by God. The Hell is presented as being a totally different place as compared to what is written about it in the Bible. As a result, reading through the text gives an image of God who is prone to the very mistakes common to humans thus ripping Him off His lofty status of divine and, instead, making Him a mere human. Whether or not Dante did it intentionally is subject to debate but one thing is clear in the poem: the misconstrued notion of God is revealed to future generations.

 

References

Babor, T. F., McGovern, T., & Robaina, K. (2017). Dante’s inferno: Seven deadly sins in scientific publishing and how to avoid them. Addiction Science: A Guide for the Perplexed, 267.

Cheney, L. D. G. (2016). Illustrations for Dante’s Inferno: A Comparative Study of Sandro Botticelli, Giovanni Stradano, and Federico Zuccaro. Cultural and Religious Studies4(8), 487.

Verdicchio, M. (2015). Irony and Desire in Dante’s” Inferno” 27. Italica, 285-297.