Conceptual frameworks

Creswell, J. W. (2018). Qualitative inquiry and research design: choosing among five approaches, 4th edition.
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Miles, M. B. & Huberman, A. M. (2020). Qualitative Data Analysis: An Expanded Sourcebook, 4’th Edition.
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications
Read CHAPTER’S 2
“Conceptual frameworks are best done graphically, at first, to support the accompanying narrative. Having to
get the entire framework on a single page obliges you to specify the bins that hold discrete phenomena, map
likely interrelationships, divide variables that are conceptually or functionally distinct, and work with all of the
information at once.” Please describe or upload an illustration that shows your INITIAL conceptual framework
for your proposed study. Please reference the text.
“Prior theorizing and empirical research are, of course, important inputs. It helps to lay out your own orienting
frame and then map onto it the variables and relationships from the literature available, to see where the
overlaps, contradictions, qualifications, and refinements are.” Please describe possible theory/theories that
may provide some “orienting frame” onto the variables and relationships from the literature available (regarding
your proposed research). (1 paragraph or more)
Please address ONE of the following question and reference the text. Also, please respond to at least two of
your peers.
READ CHAPTER 4
a. What research problems are appropriate for each of the approaches?
List three different research problems that are of interest to you. Begin with identifying the research foci, and
identify and describe which approaches might be appropriate. Draft a research question that would be
appropriate for each possible approach related to the research problem. Can you identify the subtle differences
among the research questions?
READ Chapter 5
b. What defining features of one of the five approaches can you use to begin designing your qualitative study?
Answer the following questions that apply to the approach you are considering.

  • For a narrative study: What individual do you plan to study? And do you have access to information about this
    individual’s life experiences?
  • For a phenomenology: What is the phenomenon of interest that you plan to study? And do you have access
    to people who have experienced it?
  • For a grounded theory study: What social science concept, action, or process do you plan to explore as the
    basis for you r theory? Can you interview individuals who have experienced the process?
  • For an ethnography: What cultural group of people do you plan to study? Has the culture-sharing group been
    together long enough for patterns of behavior, language, and beliefs to form?
  • For a case study: What is the case you plan to examine? Will the case be described because it is a unique
    case, or will the case be used to illustrate (and illuminate) an issue or a problem?

Sample Solution

ACED ESSAYS