Data Collection in Qualitative Research

Instructions and formatting

respond to your colleague’s post using one or more of the following approaches:
• Share an insight from having read your colleagues’ postings, synthesizing the information to provide new perspectives.
• Offer and support an alternative perspective using readings from the classroom or from your own research in the Walden Library.
• Make a suggestion based on additional evidence drawn from readings or after synthesizing multiple postings.
• Expand on your colleagues’ postings by providing additional insights or contrasting perspectives based on readings and evidence.

  1. This is a 2 paragraph essay responds
  2. The colleague’s post to responds to is below
  3. This responds should cite 2 resources and referenced on a reference page.
  4. Writer can cite from one of the articles below. Writer can use own 1 or 2 scholarly articles as well
  5. Write paragraphs in APA Fotmat
  6. Writer should use basic vocabularies

Resources

Required Readings

• Chapter 23, “Data Collection in Qualitative Research” This chapter examines the process of data collection in qualitative research as well as key issues surrounding data collection. This includes such methods as self-reporting, surveys, interviews, and personal journal keeping. The chapter also highlights important considerations when utilizing unstructured observation.

• Polit, D. F., & Beck, C. T. (2017). Nursing research: Generating and assessing evidence for nursing practice (10th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer.
o Chapter 12, “Sampling in Quantitative Research”
o Chapter 13, “Data Collection in Quantitative Research” o Chapter 22, “Sampling in Qualitative Research”

o Chapter 23, “Data Collection in Qualitative Research”
• Keough, V. A., & Tanabe, P. (2011). Survey research: An effective design for conducting nursing research. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 1(4), 37–44.

• Chapter 13, “Data Collection in Quantitative Research” Once a sampling design is complete, the next step is to collect the data, and this is the focus of Chapter 13. The chapter describes how to develop a data collection plan, and provides information about the different types of instruments that can be used, such as structured observation and biophysiologic measures.

• Chapter 22, “Sampling in Qualitative Research” The focus of this chapter is on the sampling process in qualitative research. The chapter describes the different types of sampling and when they are commonly used. Sampling techniques in the three main qualitative traditions (ethnography, phenomenological studies and grounded theory studies) are highlighted.

Keough, V. A., & Tanabe, P. (2011). Survey research: An effective design for conducting nursing research. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 1(4), 37–44. Copyright 2011 by Elsevier Science & Technology Journals. Used with permission of Elsevier Science & Technology Journals via the Copyright Clearance Center.

Krainovich-Miller, B., Haber, J., Yost, J., & Jacobs, S. (2009). Evidence-based practice challenge: teaching critical appraisal of systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines to graduate students. Journal of Nursing Education, 48(4), 186–195.

This text emphasizes the advantages of survey research. The authors describe the nuances of survey research projects, including their design, methods, analysis, and limitations.

Horsley, T., Hyde, C., Santesso, N., Parkes, J., Milne, R., & Stewart, R. (2011). Teaching critical appraisal skills in healthcare settings. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Online), 11, Art. No.: CD001270.

Patient Satisfaction Questions

The patient satisfaction survey is very important in the healthcare system because it provides workers with an opportunity to view patients’ perspectives and perceptions of their medical care. Understanding the patient point of view is very important because it give staff the opportunity to learn and make necessary adjustments to improve the quality of care delivery. I would gather patient satisfaction, ease of healthcare access, patient wait times, staff friendliness, and likelihood to refer people to my facility using a questionnaire that would be mailed out to patients. I would send out a prepaid postage questionnaire in the mail to patients. I would utilize a consecutive sampling technique. I would gather my information over a 6-month time frame. I would use a patient population to every patient encounter at my facility no matter age, gender, race, or patient complaint during a 6-month period from dates of April 15, 2019 to October 15, 2019. My questionnaire would consist of fill in the circle responses on a scale of a one to ten rating scale. My questions would include:
1) How would you rate your healthcare experience as a whole?
2) How easy was it for you to gain health care access at our facility?
3) How satisfied are you with your wait time at our facility?
5) How friendly were our staff members?
6) How likely are you to refer someone to our services?
Methods to Gather Information
I would gather my information using prepaid postage mail questionnaire for every patient that is seen at our facility over a 6-month period starting April 15, 2019, through October 15, 2019. I would use the consecutive sampling method to ensure every patient can provide feedback no matter their gender, race, age, or visit complaint. This will help to limit any form of bias to have a more valid and credible study and result. Gaining results by way of U.S mail postal services is convenient, informal to reach subjects, and allows for patients to respond when it is best suitable for them to do so (Keough & Tanabe, p. 38, 2011).
Sample Size/Population of Participants
The sample size I chose to utilize for my patient satisfaction questioning is a consecutive sampling method. Consecutive sampling involves all people from an accessible population who meet criteria for a specific time frame (Polit & Beck, p. 254, 2017). This type of sampling is a better approach than sampling by convenience since it is long enough to deal with any possible biases (Polit & Beck, p. 254, 2017).
Ensuring Reliability/Validity
I ensured that my sampling and questionnaire was valid and reliable. I protected my human participants by giving them the opportunity to and not to partake in the completion of my patient satisfaction questionnaire. The results will then be scanned through a computer system that indicates and interprets fill in the blank responses, so that there is no manipulation or misinterpreting of the results. I would then have a system analysis at my facility, formulate a result formulation configuration to interpret the results. I would make sure that every employee at my institution has access to these findings byways of monthly workplace updates via email and facility web base program. I would also include these results on a PowerPoint and bulletin boards in my facility and at our company’s monthly meetings. Reporting of these results by this means would be reported objectively and not subjectively (Keough & Tanabe, p. 41, 2011). Administering patient questionnaire helps to add to the validity and reliability of my research design and results (O’Sullivan & Rasmussen, 2017).
References
Keough, V. A., & Tanabe, P. (2011). Survey research: An effective design for conducting
research. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 1(4), 37–44. Copyright 2011 by Elsevier
Science & Technology Journals. Used with permission of Elsevier Science &
Technology Journals via the Copyright Clearance Center
O’Sullivan, E. J., & Rasmussen, K. M. (2017). Research: Development, Construct Validity, and
Reliability of the Questionnaire on Infant Feeding: A Tool for Measuring Contemporary
Infant-Feeding Behaviors. Journal of The Academy of Nutrition And Dietetics,
doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2017.05.006
Polit, D. F., & Beck, C. T. (2017). Nursing research: Generating and assessing evidence for
nursing practice (10th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer

Instructions and formatting
respond to your colleague’s post using one or more of the following approaches:
• Share an insight from having read your colleagues’ postings, synthesizing the information to provide new perspectives.
• Offer and support an alternative perspective using readings from the classroom or from your own research in the Walden Library.
• Make a suggestion based on additional evidence drawn from readings or after synthesizing multiple postings.
• Expand on your colleagues’ postings by providing additional insights or contrasting perspectives based on readings and evidence.

  1. This is a 2 paragraph essay responds
  2. The colleague’s post to responds to is below
  3. This responds should cite 2 resources and referenced on a reference page.
  4. Writer can cite from one of the articles below. Writer can use own 1 or 2 scholarly articles as well
  5. Write paragraphs in APA Fotmat
  6. Writer should use basic vocabularies

Resources

Required Readings

• Chapter 23, “Data Collection in Qualitative Research” This chapter examines the process of data collection in qualitative research as well as key issues surrounding data collection. This includes such methods as self-reporting, surveys, interviews, and personal journal keeping. The chapter also highlights important considerations when utilizing unstructured observation.

• Polit, D. F., & Beck, C. T. (2017). Nursing research: Generating and assessing evidence for nursing practice (10th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer.
o Chapter 12, “Sampling in Quantitative Research”
o Chapter 13, “Data Collection in Quantitative Research” o Chapter 22, “Sampling in Qualitative Research”

o Chapter 23, “Data Collection in Qualitative Research”
• Keough, V. A., & Tanabe, P. (2011). Survey research: An effective design for conducting nursing research. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 1(4), 37–44.

• Chapter 13, “Data Collection in Quantitative Research” Once a sampling design is complete, the next step is to collect the data, and this is the focus of Chapter 13. The chapter describes how to develop a data collection plan, and provides information about the different types of instruments that can be used, such as structured observation and biophysiologic measures.

• Chapter 22, “Sampling in Qualitative Research” The focus of this chapter is on the sampling process in qualitative research. The chapter describes the different types of sampling and when they are commonly used. Sampling techniques in the three main qualitative traditions (ethnography, phenomenological studies and grounded theory studies) are highlighted.

Keough, V. A., & Tanabe, P. (2011). Survey research: An effective design for conducting nursing research. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 1(4), 37–44. Copyright 2011 by Elsevier Science & Technology Journals. Used with permission of Elsevier Science & Technology Journals via the Copyright Clearance Center.

Krainovich-Miller, B., Haber, J., Yost, J., & Jacobs, S. (2009). Evidence-based practice challenge: teaching critical appraisal of systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines to graduate students. Journal of Nursing Education, 48(4), 186–195.

This text emphasizes the advantages of survey research. The authors describe the nuances of survey research projects, including their design, methods, analysis, and limitations.

Horsley, T., Hyde, C., Santesso, N., Parkes, J., Milne, R., & Stewart, R. (2011). Teaching critical appraisal skills in healthcare settings. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Online), 11, Art. No.: CD001270.

Planning for Data Collection

Data collection involves the gathering of information to answer a research question (Polit & Beck, 2017). There are various forms of data collection in quantitative and qualitative research. When conducting research, it is essential that the researcher find the appropriate study type to generate the desired outcome. In any specialty, there is a unique core body of knowledge that needs to be mastered by the nurse in order to provide quality patient care (Laureate Education, 2012). Part of the process of gathering this knowledge is by getting feedback from staff and or patients on care practices, so as to know how it can be improved. Patient surveys are a way of getting such feedback. Even though patient surveys rank somewhat low on the hierarchy of evidence due to the use of patient-reported data, it has advantages such as flexibility and its ability to be utilized when sampling large populations (Keough &Tanabe, 2011). In this scenario of surveying the population of a primary care practice that serves a large population, various survey methods could be explored.

Prior to conducting a survey, it is important to come up with research questions that are clear, concise and measurable (Keough &Tanabe, 2011). In this scenario, 5 questions addressing different variables will be generated to assess patient satisfaction. Using measures of overall patient experience and satisfaction in assessing the quality of care is important as a means of integrating the views of service users into the assessment of health services (Paddison et al., 2015).

5 Survey Questions

Using a scale of 1-5, with the following representations

  1. Very Poor (2) Poor (3) Fair (4) Good (5) Very Good. Answer the questions below
  2. How will you rate the speed at which you were able to see your provider?
  3. How would you rate the wait time process?
  4. How would you rate the clinic’s staff courtesy towards you?
  5. How would you rate the care you received here at the clinic when recommending or discussing it with others?
  6. How would you rate the helpfulness of the time spent with the physician?

Methods and Instruments Used to Gather Data

Data collection instrument for this survey would be by using structured self-report instruments, specifically by collecting questionnaire data through in-person distribution. Questionnaires can be distributed in different ways such as in-person interaction, via mail or through the internet (Polit & Beck, 2017). Even though a face-to-face interaction is considered an excellent way to collect data from patients, the investment of time and resources make it challenging to execute. According to Keough &Tanabe (2011), a mixed method approach could be used. Using this, I will give the patients a web-based survey, with a backup plan of using a mail survey for non-responders. The advantage of using Internet-based surveys is its ability to reach many participants very easily and quickly (Keough &Tanabe, 2011).

Sampling Methods

        The sampling method best suited for this survey project would be Quota Sampling. By using a quota sampling, strata of the population of 10,000 patients could be identified, in this case. They could be identified by gender, race, age, service period, or other demographics. A power analysis will be conducted to determine how many responses are needed to make the study statistically significant. Out of the 10,000 patients, we would extract a quota sample of 4000 males and 6000 females. And out of that, a convenience sample of 400 males and 600 females could be extracted to represent the actual population. Totaling 1000 patients. Due to the large population, a convenience sample may be best suited to narrow down the number of study participants and still maintain strong power analysis. The best way to avoid response bias is to implement measures that enhance response rates such as adding monetary compensation for participation (Keough &Tanabe, 2011). A key to ensuring reliability and validity of a study is making sure that the eligibility criteria and inclusion criteria are a true depiction of the target population (Polit & Beck, 2017).

References

. Keough, V. A., & Tanabe, P. (2011). Survey research: An Effective Design for Conducting

        Nursing Research. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 1(4), 37-44 8p. Retrieved from

        http://web.a.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=4&si         d=442cc7c4-6013-46d5-a07f-061370656824%40sessionmgr4004&hid=4201

Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2012b). Data collection. Baltimore, MD:

        Author

Paddison, C. M., Abel, G. A., Roland, M. O., Elliott, M. N., Lyratzopoulos, G., & Campbell, J.

L. (2015). Drivers of overall satisfaction with primary care: Evidence from the English General Practice Patient Survey. Health Expectations, 18(5), 1081-1092 12p. doi:10.1111/hex.12081
Polit, D. F., & Beck, C. T. (2017). Nursing research: Generating and assessing evidence for nursing practice
(9th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Sample Solution

ACED ESSAYS