Kendall Wallis

PAIR A: ANSWER QUESTION 1 OR QUESTION 2 (FOUR POINTS)

  1. Why does Kendall Wallis ultimately decide to go along with Piasecki’s scheme?
    a. What personal, social, and economic factors (i.e., beyond the company) contribute to his decision?
    b. Compare Kendall Wallis with either Franz Brucher, the preteen protagonist of “The Balek Scales” (Böll, 1966; Week 6) or Munshi Vanshidhar, the eponymous protagonist of “The Salt Inspector” (Premchand, 2011/c. 1930; Week 6), in terms of the behaviors they take in response to their life circumstances, and what happens to them as a result of the behaviors.
  2. As Epley and Kumar (2019; Week 2) point out, “even well-meaning and well-informed people are more ethically malleable than one might guess” (p. 147). Epley and Kumar (2019) discuss four contextual factors that affect people’s behavior in organizations and therefore “need to be addressed when designing an ethical culture: explicit values, thoughts during judgment, incentives, and cultural norms” (p. 147). Account for Kendall’s behavior in terms of two of these factors.
    PAIR B: ANSWER QUESTION 3 OR QUESTION 4 (FOUR POINTS)
  3. Suppose that Kendall, before starting to work at Jimmy Dimon’s publishing house, had read and incorporated the advice of Kouchaki and Smith (2020; Week 6). Which specific recommendations in their article could have prevented Kendall’s unethical behavior?
  4. Suppose that Kendall, before agreeing to participate in Piasecki’s scheme, had studied Kahneman and Tversky’s concept of System 1 vs. System 2 thinking, as discussed by Bazerman (2020; Week 3) and Haugh (2017; Week 4). How might this knowledge have prevented Kendall from agreeing to the scheme?
    PAIR C: ANSWER QUESTION 5 OR QUESTION 6 (FOUR POINTS)
  5. Crossan, Côte, and Virgin (2020; Week 5) advise using character as a criterion for selecting leaders. Arguably, character is important not only for leaders, but for all members of organizations. Indeed, Smith and Kouchaki (2020; Week 5) tell us to take advantage of opportunities in the workplace to develop our character.
    a. To what extent would you attribute Kendall’s participation in the embezzlement to his character? Explain.
    b. How can people strengthen their character to become less susceptible to contextual pressures?
  6. Dimon, who made his fortune in the pornography business, is described as a “libertine.”

a. To what extent is he therefore necessarily an immoral leader? Tie your answer to two of the following articles: Bazerman (2000; Week 3), Bower (2020; Week 3), and Hirsh, Zyglidopoulos, and Alekos (2020, Week 5).
b. Refer to the Ppt for Week 5 and the article by “No author” (2015; Week 5). How do you expect Dimon, given his character deficiencies and excesses, to respond when he learns that his employees have been embezzling from him? Why?

PAIR D: ANSWER QUESTION 7 OR QUESTION 8 (FOUR POINTS)

  1. Haugh (2017; Week 4) discusses “eight rationalizations most commonly used by those committing unethical and illegal acts within companies” (Haugh, 2017; Week 4).

a. Which of these did Kendall use to rationalize what he did?
b. What other rationalization(s) did he use?

  1. Suppose that Dimon, upon discovering that his employees have been embezzling from him, reads Haugh (2017; Week 4), decides that having a second accountant is an inadequate ethics and compliance program, and hires you as a behavioral consultant. What specific suggestions will you give him to reduce his employees’ rationalization going forward?

PAIR E: ANSWER QUESTION 9 OR QUESTION 10 (FOUR POINTS)

  1. When Kendall begins to reap the financial benefits of his and Piasecki’s scheme, he also becomes a more productive employee. Why? What are the implications for those who design organizational ethics and compliance programs?
  2. At the end of the story, Kendall learns that Dimon is far more alert and perceptive than he and Piasecki had thought. What do you think Kendall will do after getting off the phone with Dimon? Why? What do you think will happen to him? Do you think he deserves such an outcome? Why (not)?

Name 1: Name 3:
Name 2: Name 4:

Did you answer ONE question from each pair?
Pair A B C D E

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Question 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
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Sample Solution

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