Leadership and Management in Early Years Services

Discuss the key challenges and the responsibilities of ECCE Pre-school management in dealing with a) Multi professional working b) Partnership with parents

NB: Please Note:
Please use the attached word documents as a guideline to writing this essay they will give you an over view of what should be included in this essay.
Essay Details:

Leadership and Management in Early Years Services, Discuss the key challenges and the responsibilities of ECCE Pre-school management in dealing with

a) Multi professional working
b) Partnership with parents

What needs to be included……

1. What challenges could arise in relation to the above two areas a and b
2. What is the responsibility of management in dealing with these challenges
3. Draw on practice experience and link to research and legal and quality frameworks
4. Include Lewin’s three step model

Quality Frameworks:

http://www.ncca.biz/Aistear/pdfs/Guidelines_ENG/Practitioners_ENG.pdf

http://siolta.ie/services_standard3.php

Legal

 https://www.pobal.ie/Publications/Documents/Partnership%20with%20Parents%20=%20Success%20A%20Case%20Study.pdf

References:

Desforges, C. and Abouchaar, A (2003) The Impact of Parental Involvement, Parental Support and Family Education on Pupil Achievements and Adjustment. London: DCSF.

Goldman, R. (2005) Father’s Involvement in their Children’s Learning. London: National Family and Parenting Institute

Wheeler, H. and Connor, J. (2006) Parents, Early Years and Learning. London: National Children’s Bureau. Available at: www.ncb.org.ukAccessed 16/02/15

DCSF (2007) Every Parent Matters. Available at: www.education.gov.uk/publications
(accessed 16/02/15)

DCSF (2008) Parent as Partners in Early Learning. Available at www.foundationyears.org.uk
(accessed 16/02/15)

Df E (2014) SEN Code of Practice. Available at www.education.gov.uk/publications
(accessed 16/02/15)
Reading

Aubrey C. (2011) Leading and managing in the early years. 2nd edn. London: Sage.

Jones, C. and Pound, L. (2008) Leadership and management in the early years: from principles to practice. Maidenhead: Open University Press/McGraw-Hill Education.

Miller L. and Cable C. (2011) Professionalization, leadership and management in the early years. London: Sage.

Moyles J. (2006) Effective leadership and management in the early years.
Maidenhead: Open University Press/McGraw-Hill Education.

Mullins, L.J. (2013) Management and organisational behaviour. 10th edn. Harlow: Pearson.

Rodd, J. (2015). Leading Change in Early Years. Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill.

Robins, A. and Callan, S. (2008) Managing early years settings–supporting and leading teams. London: Sage.

Sade, E. and Sade, J. (2009) Good practice in nursery management. 3rd edn. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes.

Smith, A. and Langston, A. (1999) Managing staff in early years settings. London: out ledge.

Academic Journals:

Educational Management Administration & Leadership
Leadership & Organization Development

Multi-Agency Working

Definitions: “Integrated working (multi-agency working) is when everyone supporting children and young people works together effectively to put the child at the centre, meet their needs and improve their lives.” (Integrated Working Factsheet 2008, Children’s Workforce Development Council)
“Moving towards integrated working entails a radical change in organisational structures, working processes and cultures.”
(Oliver, C.; Mooney, A. and Statham, J. (2010). Integrated Working: A Review of the Evidence. CWDC and Thomas Coram Research Unit. IOE. )
Also known as………….
 Multi-professional working
 Multi-agency working
 Cross-professional approach
 Inter-agency working
 Inter-agency approach
Aims of a Multi-Agency Approach
According to the Department for Education the benefits of an Integrated Approach include:
 early identification and intervention
 easier or quicker access to services or expertise
 improved achievement in education and better engagement in education
 better support for parents
 children, young people and family’s needs addressed more appropriately
 better quality services
 reduced need for more specialist services.
 ww.education.gov.uk

WHY! Why the sudden interest in Multi-Agency Working?
Background to the Approach
 The Children and Young Peoples Services Committees (CYPSC) have highlighted inter agency working as important for improving services for our children and young people.
 This reflects international best practice in the area.

Multi-Agency Working and Family Resource Centres
 Family Resource Centres are the heart of the multi-agency approach as they employ professionals from education and health.
 They focus on early intervention and holistic support.
 Initially targeted the most disadvantaged areas.
Indices of Multiple Deprivation
 Income
 Employment
 Health Deprivation and Disability
 Education, skills and training
 Barriers to housing and services
 Crime
 Living environment
Family Resource Centres
Core Purpose
1. Information and Advice
2. Education and Training
3. Community groups e.g. childcare, after school clubs
4. Listening to the needs of those in the community
5. Counselling
6. Supporting personal and group development
(Tusla, n.d.)
NB: Implications for Leaders/Managers?
 Consider how the multi-agency approach may have an impact upon your role as a leader or manager.
 Imagine you are the leader of a Family Resource Centre with a very diverse staff team?
 What are the implications for your roles and responsibilities?
Reflect back …..
 Consider the styles of leadership we have discussed so far on this module. Which styles of leadership would be best suited for integrated leadership?
 How can Belbin’s team roles be of particular significance when managing multi-agency teams?
 Why is supervision and appraisal particularly important when leading multi-agency teams?
Key Benefits
 What do you think are the key benefits to an Multi-Agency Approach?
Challenges………………..
 And what might be the difficulties?

 Anning, A. et al (2010) Developing Multi-Professional Teamwork for Integrated Children’s Services. OUP.
 Integrated working: www.cwdcouncil.org.uk
 The Core Purpose of Sure Start Children’s Centres is from the DfE website www.education.gov.uk
 The Children Act 2004 is accessed via the following link: http://www.surreycc.gov.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/168600/CYPP-Childrens-Act-Briefing-v2.pdf
 Oliver, C.; Mooney, A. and Statham, J. (2010). Integrated Working: A Review of the Evidence. CWDC and Thomas Coram Research Unit. IOE. )
 Family Resource centres: http://www.tusla.ie/services/family-community-support/family-resource-centres
Reading:
 DCYA. (2011). Working Together for Children – A review of international evidence on interagency working, to inform the development of Children’s Services Committees in Ireland. Dublin: Government Publications.
 Leading and Managing in the Early Years: A Study of the Impact of a NCSL Programme on Children’s Centre Leaders’ Perceptions of Leadership and Practice (Lynn Ang)
 Chapter 8 of Aubrey, C. (2014) Leading and Managing in the Early Years

Partnerships with Parents
Rationale:
 The State acknowledges that the primary and natural educator of the child is the Family and guarantees to respect the inalienable right and duty of parents to provide, according to their means, for the religious and moral, intellectual, physical and social education of their children’ (Irish Constitution, 1937)
Partnership with Parents:
 What do you understand by the term, ‘Partnership’?
 How can you enable genuine partnerships to develop between you and the parents of children in your setting?
 What are the barriers to effective partnerships?
What does Siolta say? What does Aistear Say?
Partnership Matters:
How does this guidance inform your practice?
List five practical things you could do in your setting to promote/build partnership between practitioners and parents.
Parents as Partners 2007
 In the early years, parental aspirations and encouragement have a significant impact on children’s cognitive development and literacy and numeracy skills;
 Parental involvement in a child’s schooling between the ages of 7 and 16 is a more powerful force than
 family background, size of family and level of parental education;
 Educational failure is increased by lack of parental interest in schooling;
 In particular, a father’s interest in a child’s schooling is strongly linked to educational outcomes for the child
 Most parents believe that responsibility for their child’s education is shared between parents and schools;
 Many parents want to be involved in their children’s education. In a study, 72% of parents said that they wanted more involvement;
 Selective parenting interventions can substantially improve childhood behaviour. With on-going intervention, there is a real prospect of better school attainments and less violence
Parents Matters

Help make connection between home and school
Desforges Research:
In 2003 Charles Desforges and Alberto Abouchaar conducted a review of literature called:
“The Impact of Parental Involvement, parental Support and Family Education on Pupil Achievements and Adjustment: A Literature Review.”
As part of their findings, they concluded
“Differences between parents in their level of involvement are associated with social class, poverty, health, and also with parental perception of their role and their levels of confidence in fulfilling it. Some parents are put off by feeling put down by schools and teachers.”
What are the implications of this research for schools and settings?
 The extent of parental involvement diminishes as the child gets older and is strongly influenced at all ages by the child characteristically taking a very active mediating role.
 Parental involvement is strongly influenced by the child’s level of attainment: the higher the level of attainment, the more the parents get involved.
 Parental involvement in the form of ‘ at home good parenting’ has a significant positive effect on children’s achievements and adjustment even after all factors shaping attainment have been taken out of the equation.
Barriers that stops parents getting involved?
 Work Commitments
 Time and pressures in busy life
 Childcare needs
 Pressures due to lack of money, illness, disability, single-parent status
 Own education level-confidence that you can make a difference
 Knowledge of what to do
 Negative feelings about schools from own experience
 Own literacy and numeracy levels poor
 English not first language
 Attitudes: ‘It’s the school’s job.’
 Poor experience of other professionals
 Past and ongoing experiences of discrimination, including race, gender, class, disability, sexual orientation
 Parents unable to understand or share educational approach
 Teacher attitudes, not valuing or listening to parent’s view of the child
 Parents not confident in the face of professional expertise
 Teachers lacking confidence in talking to parents
Partnership with Parents = Success
A case study
 https://www.pobal.ie/Publications/Documents/Partnership%20with%20Parents%20=%20Success%20A%20Case%20Study.pdf
Parents, Early Years and Learning (PEAL)
(Parenting Programme in the UK)
 2 year programme (2005-2007)
 Funded by the DFES
 National Children’s Bureau, Thomas Coram and Camden LEA
 Best Practice Framework for working with families in disadvantaged areas
 Based on existing research into effective approaches for working in partnership with parents
 Shares information with parents about early learning and child development.
Principles of PEAL
 Children learn best in the context of warm, loving relationships.
 Parents play the key role in children’s learning. They are experts on their own children and they are a child’s first and enduring educators.
 Parents want the best for their children and want to be involved in their children’s learning.
 All parents are entitled to be involved in children’ s learning and to be supported in whatever way they are able or wish to engage.
 All families and individual children are different, and acknowledging and respecting this is crucial to building genuine relationships built on trust and openness.
 Life for young children isn’t separated into education and care times and places, play times or learning times. It is a seamless whole, whether they are in their homes or in early years provision; and the importance of this continuity should be reflected in settings and in other family support services

PEAL Value Statements
We need to know a great deal about our parents to be able to encourage any participation in learning
All parents naturally relate to their children and encourage day to day interactions with their child.

Parents and practitioners have to act together in completely equal partnerships to be effective The early child-parent bond is so important that practitioners need to keep a professional distance from a young baby if a parent is feeling pushed out

Only very well-resourced and managed settings have the means to develop strategies for involving parents in their children’s learning.
Working with parents is a separate role to working with children, requiring different skills, qualities, training and qualifications.

Goldman, R. (2005)
 Focused on father’s roles in their children’s education
 Recognised that fathers may have particular barriers to involvement in their child’s education
 Father’s interest and involvement leads to better social, emotional and educational outcomes
 Fathers’ interest adds additional benefits to mothers’ interest and involvement
 Some studies suggest that fathers’ involvement has a particular impact on boys’ outcomes
 Father can mean ‘male role model’

Dads Matter video
 http://www.creativeeducation.co.uk/video/635
 This example of encouraging dads to be involved in their child’s learning is based in primary school.
 Consider how these principles could be adapted to an early years setting context.
Role of the Leader/Manager
 How can the leader and manager of the setting promote parental partnerships?
 Create a list of strategies which can be introduced to encourage parental participation.
 How could you ensure that you involve ‘hard to reach’ parents?

Triple P (Positive Parenting Programme)
 Positive Parenting Program is one of the most effective evidence-based parenting programs in the world. Triple P gives parents simple and practical strategies to help them confidently manage their children’s behaviour, prevent problems developing and build strong, healthy relationships. Triple P has been shown to work across cultures, socio-economic groups and in all kinds of family structures.
http://www.triplep.net/glo-en/home/

Key Principles When Working with Parents
1. Acknowledge and draw upon parental knowledge and expertise in relation to their child.
2. Focus on the child’s strength as well as their area of need
3. Recognise the personal and emotional investment of parents and be aware of their feelings.
4. Ensure that understand procedures and are aware of how to access support and given documents well before review meetings
Key Principles When Working with Parents
5. Respect the validity of differing perspectives and seek constructive ways of reconciling different viewpoints.
6. Respect the differing needs that parents themselves may have such as a disability, or communication and linguistic barriers.
7. Recognise the need for flexibility in the timing and structure of meetings.
(SEN Code of Practice, 2001, cited in Tassoni, P. (2003). Supporting Special Needs. Understanding Inclusion in the Early Years. Heinemann.)
References
 Desforges, C. and Abouchaar, A (2003) The Impact of Parental Involvement, Parental Support and Family Education on Pupil Achievements and Adjustment. London: DCSF.
 Goldman, R. (2005) Father’s Involvement in their Children’s Learning. London: National Family and Parenting Institute
 Wheeler, H. and Connor, J. (2006) Parents, Early Years and Learning. London: National Children’s Bureau. Available at: www.ncb.org.uk Accessed 16/02/15
 DCSF (2007) Every Parent Matters. Available at: www.education.gov.uk/publications (accessed 16/02/15)
 DCSF (2008) Parent as Partners in Early Learning. Available at www.foundationyears.org.uk (accessed 16/02/15)
 DfE (2014) SEN Code of Practice. Available at www.education.gov.uk/publications
 Read the executive summary from the Parental Involvement in Early Learning document from the Bernard Van Leer foundation.
 Read chapters 3 and 4 of Desforges and Abouchaar’s literature review

Goldman, R. (2005)
 Focused on father’s roles in their children’s education
 Recognised that fathers may have particular barriers to involvement in their child’s education
 Father’s interest and involvement leads to better social, emotional and educational outcomes
 Fathers’ interest adds additional benefits to mothers’ interest and involvement
 Some studies suggest that fathers’ involvement has a particular impact on boys’ outcomes
 Father can mean ‘male role model’
Dads Matter video
 http://www.creativeeducation.co.uk/video/635
 This example of encouraging dads to be involved in their child’s learning is based in primary school.
 Consider how these principles could be adapted to an early years setting context.

Role of the Leader/Manager
 How can the leader and manager of the setting promote parental partnerships?
 Create a list of strategies which can be introduced to encourage parental participation.
 How could you ensure that you involve ‘hard to reach’ parents?

Triple P (Positive Parenting Programme)
 Positive Parenting Program is one of the most effective evidence-based parenting programs in the world. Triple P gives parents simple and practical strategies to help them confidently manage their children’s behaviour, prevent problems developing and build strong, healthy relationships. Triple P has been shown to work across cultures, socio-economic groups and in all kinds of family structures.
http://www.triplep.net/glo-en/home/

Key Principles When Working with Parents
1. Acknowledge and draw upon parental knowledge and expertise in relation to their child.
2. Focus on the child’s strength as well as their area of need
3. Recognise the personal and emotional investment of parents and be aware of their feelings.
4. Ensure that understand procedures and are aware of how to access support and given documents well before review meetings
Key Principles When Working with Parents
5. Respect the validity of differing perspectives and seek constructive ways of reconciling different viewpoints.
6. Respect the differing needs that parents themselves may have such as a disability, or communication and linguistic barriers.
7. Recognise the need for flexibility in the timing and structure of meetings.
(SEN Code of Practice, 2001, cited in Tassoni, P. (2003). Supporting Special Needs. Understanding Inclusion in the Early Years. Heinemann.)
References
 Desforges, C. and Abouchaar, A (2003) The Impact of Parental Involvement, Parental Support and Family Education on Pupil Achievements and Adjustment. London: DCSF.
 Goldman, R. (2005) Father’s Involvement in their Children’s Learning. London: National Family and Parenting Institute
 Wheeler, H. and Connor, J. (2006) Parents, Early Years and Learning. London: National Children’s Bureau. Available at: www.ncb.org.uk Accessed 16/02/15
 DCSF (2007) Every Parent Matters. Available at: www.education.gov.uk/publications (accessed 16/02/15)
 DCSF (2008) Parent as Partners in Early Learning. Available at www.foundationyears.org.uk (accessed 16/02/15)
 DfE (2014) SEN Code of Practice. Available at www.education.gov.uk/publications
 Read the executive summary from the Parental Involvement in Early Learning document from the Bernard Van Leer foundation.
 Read chapters 3 and 4 of Desforges and Abouchaar’s literature review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sample Solution

ACED ESSAYS