The FWP consists of two parts:
a written portion that provides a solution or a group of solutions for the problem you have discussed in Essays No. 1 and No. 2(provide in the link)
a multimedia representation of your solution, which you may include at the end of the written portion in the same file or as its own file—uploaded along with the written portion. Please don’t submit these files separately; upload both of them and submit them to the dropbox together.

Before beginning to compose the FWP, you must read the assigned reading in Module Three/The Final Writing Project, as well as the accompanying notes from me. You may access this information under Module Three/The Final Writing Project on the left nav bar of our Blackboard classroom. Please do not attempt to write the FWP without having first read the assigned pages and notes. You will need to refer back to these often while composing the FWP.
Requirements:
Times New Roman 12 pt. font, double-spaced
6 pages in length (before you put it in numbered-sentence form)*
Inclusion of Multimedia Component (please see below)
Formatted to meet all MLA guidelines
Written in the disinterested third-person (keep yourself out of the essay)
Avoidance of the ambiguous “you” (Ex.: If you want this problem to stop, then you have to speak up.)
In-text reference to at least two authoritative outside sources, plus a Works Cited page (use MLA)
Avoidance of block quotes (A block quote is any direct quote that is longer than four typed lines on your essay; it doesn’t matter how many lines the quote is in the actual source from which you are taking it.)
Focused thesis statement that clearly states the problem and the solution(s).
Please note that you must identify for me which solution proposal pattern you are following (see assigned reading notes). Please make your chosen pattern the title of the written portion of your FWP.
*Drafts for the workshop should be in numbered-sentence form; however, the final submission to me should be in REGULAR FORMAT, which is a departure from what we did for Essay No. 1 and Essay No. 2.
Overview:
The FWP consists of two parts:
1) a written portion that provides a solution or a group of solutions for the problem you have discussed in Essays No. 1 and No. 2
2) a multimedia representation of your solution, which you may include at the end of the written portion in the same file or as its own file—uploaded along with the written portion. Please don’t submit these files separately; upload both of them and submit them to the dropbox together.
Goals for the written portion:
To propose a solution or a group of solutions for the problem you have discussed in Essays No. 1 and No. 2. Your solution (s) should go beyond the obvious! I am asking you to go beyond any obvious solutions. For example, let’s say you choose to write about teenagers who smoke cigarettes. Your proposed solution shouldn’t simply be to educate them about quitting. Or, let’s say you decide to write about obesity. Your proposed solution shouldn’t be simply to have people eat healthy and exercise. I am asking you to be synthesize some of the current solutions (that may not be working very well, or at all) and then to be creative and come up with something better. Your solution(s) should propose some new idea(s).

To clearly explain the solution or groups of solutions.
To demonstrate the logical implementation of your solution(s) by using an accepted rhetorical strategy (covered in the assigned reading and accompanying course notes for Module 3 [Chapter 9 in The Prentice Hall Guide for College Writers]).
To persuade others that your solution(s) will work.
To answer possible objections.
To provide evidence and support from outside sources, which should be strong sources. Please read “Choosing Strong Sources for Academic Writing” under the Course Notes link on the left nav bar of our classroom. Also, please be sure to take advantage of the KSU Library Resources link on the left nav bar of our classroom.
To properly cite your evidence and support as both in-text direct quotations and in-text paraphrases, according to MLA guidelines.
To provide a properly formatted Works Cited page according to MLA guidelines.
To demonstrate correct grammar, punctuation, syntax, and mechanics in your writing.

Goals for the multimedia representation:
To create and design your own original multimedia representation that represents the solution(s) to your problem by
• learning about the various components and techniques of a multimedia representation and how to analyze them (these are covered in the assigned reading and accompanying course notes for Module 3 [Chapter 5 in The Prentice Hall Guide for College Writers]).
• applying this knowledge in creating your own visual representation
You have much creative freedom in designing your multimedia representation, though please remember that it should be done well. It should be logical, work towards providing a deeper understanding of your solution(s), creative, thoughtful, and all text must adhere to the accepted standards of correct grammar, mechanics, syntax, spelling, and punctuation. Please be sure to view the list of the kinds of multimedia representations you may use on page 125 in The Prentice Hall Guide for College Writers. Please remember, too, that whatever you submit must be in a format that I can see or hear. Credit will not be given to files that I cannot access.
*The multimedia representation counts as one page toward the page-length requirement for the FWP.
Evaluation for all assignments
First and foremost, your writing will be evaluated on its grammar, spelling, mechanics, and punctuation. As I mentioned above, I grade at the sentence-level, line by line. Your writing will also be evaluated on its adherence to MLA guidelines (including in-text citations and the Works Cited page), as well as formatting requirements. Finally, your writing will be evaluated on how well it meets the criteria listed above for each writing assignment. I do not grade effort, nor is my grading “subjective.” The best way to get an idea of how I grade objectively is to look at the Key to Errors, which is available for you on the left nav bar of our Blackboard classroom. I strongly urge you to print this and become familiar with it. I use it to grade your work, and you will be REQUIRED to use it to provide feedback to your partner in our peer editing workshops for Essays No. 1, No. 2, and the FWP.

Sample Solution

Sample solution

Dante Alighieri played a critical role in the literature world through his poem Divine Comedy that was written in the 14th century. The poem contains Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. The Inferno is a description of the nine circles of torment that are found on the earth. It depicts the realms of the people that have gone against the spiritual values and who, instead, have chosen bestial appetite, violence, or fraud and malice. The nine circles of hell are limbo, lust, gluttony, greed and wrath. Others are heresy, violence, fraud, and treachery. The purpose of this paper is to examine the Dante’s Inferno in the perspective of its portrayal of God’s image and the justification of hell. 

In this epic poem, God is portrayed as a super being guilty of multiple weaknesses including being egotistic, unjust, and hypocritical. Dante, in this poem, depicts God as being more human than divine by challenging God’s omnipotence. Additionally, the manner in which Dante describes Hell is in full contradiction to the morals of God as written in the Bible. When god arranges Hell to flatter Himself, He commits egotism, a sin that is common among human beings (Cheney, 2016). The weakness is depicted in Limbo and on the Gate of Hell where, for instance, God sends those who do not worship Him to Hell. This implies that failure to worship Him is a sin.

God is also depicted as lacking justice in His actions thus removing the godly image. The injustice is portrayed by the manner in which the sodomites and opportunists are treated. The opportunists are subjected to banner chasing in their lives after death followed by being stung by insects and maggots. They are known to having done neither good nor bad during their lifetimes and, therefore, justice could have demanded that they be granted a neutral punishment having lived a neutral life. The sodomites are also punished unfairly by God when Brunetto Lattini is condemned to hell despite being a good leader (Babor, T. F., McGovern, T., & Robaina, K. (2017). While he commited sodomy, God chooses to ignore all the other good deeds that Brunetto did.

Finally, God is also portrayed as being hypocritical in His actions, a sin that further diminishes His godliness and makes Him more human. A case in point is when God condemns the sin of egotism and goes ahead to commit it repeatedly. Proverbs 29:23 states that “arrogance will bring your downfall, but if you are humble, you will be respected.” When Slattery condemns Dante’s human state as being weak, doubtful, and limited, he is proving God’s hypocrisy because He is also human (Verdicchio, 2015). The actions of God in Hell as portrayed by Dante are inconsistent with the Biblical literature. Both Dante and God are prone to making mistakes, something common among human beings thus making God more human.

To wrap it up, Dante portrays God is more human since He commits the same sins that humans commit: egotism, hypocrisy, and injustice. Hell is justified as being a destination for victims of the mistakes committed by God. The Hell is presented as being a totally different place as compared to what is written about it in the Bible. As a result, reading through the text gives an image of God who is prone to the very mistakes common to humans thus ripping Him off His lofty status of divine and, instead, making Him a mere human. Whether or not Dante did it intentionally is subject to debate but one thing is clear in the poem: the misconstrued notion of God is revealed to future generations.

 

References

Babor, T. F., McGovern, T., & Robaina, K. (2017). Dante’s inferno: Seven deadly sins in scientific publishing and how to avoid them. Addiction Science: A Guide for the Perplexed, 267.

Cheney, L. D. G. (2016). Illustrations for Dante’s Inferno: A Comparative Study of Sandro Botticelli, Giovanni Stradano, and Federico Zuccaro. Cultural and Religious Studies4(8), 487.

Verdicchio, M. (2015). Irony and Desire in Dante’s” Inferno” 27. Italica, 285-297.